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Aebleskiver

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Aebleskiver recipes from around the world.

There are probably as many recipes for aebleskiver as there are cooks making them.  As you might know I have my own, but that one I do not give out.  We are selling the "Arne's Instant Aebleskiver Mix" to our customers and they just love it.

Here are some more you can use and we will be adding more as time allow us. Anyone wanting to add to the list are very welcome and we will give credit to the sender if they want.

Look here for recipes:

This one is from the company Nordic Ware.

2 eggs separated
2 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 1/2 tsp. sugar
1 cup flour
1/2 tsp. tsp. baking powder
1 cup milk
1/4 tsp. salt.

In medium bowl beat egg yolks until light in color, stir in sugar. Stir together remaining dry ingredients; add to egg mixture.  Alternately with milk. Mix in oil, in a separate bowl beat egg whites until stiff; fold into batter.  Bake aebleskiver as directed.  Yields about 28.

Tip: Aebleskiver may be filled with 1 small slice of fresh apple, a small cube of cheese or 1 tsp. of jam.

More recipes from their kitchen.

1 cup prepared biscuit mix
3/4 cup of milk
1 egg
1 tbsp. vegetable oil

In medium bowl stir together all ingredients. Bake aebleskiver as directed. Yield: 21.

Another one.

This one is from Betty Crocker

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 egg whites
  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 2 cups buttermilk
  • 1 cup vegetable oil for frying

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Note: You will need an aebleskiver pan to cook these properly. Beat the whites stiff.
  2. Mix together the flour, baking powder, salt, baking soda, sugar, melted butter and buttermilk at one time and beat until smooth. Gently fold in the egg whites last.
  3. Put about 1tablespoon of vegetable oil in the bottom of each aebleskiver pan cup and heat until hot. Pour in about 2 tablespoons of the batter into each cup. As soon as they get bubbly around the edge, turn them quickly (Danish cooks use a long knitting needle, but a fork will work). Continue cooking, turning the ball to keep it from burning.

 


Here is one from Look Co.

Danish Aebleskiver Baked in a special pan, these light pancake balls are often served on Christmas Eve. This recipe came from Denmark in the 1890Ãs.

2 cups all-purpose flour
2 tablespoons margarine or butter, melted
2 cups buttermilk
3 eggs, separated
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
* teaspoon salt

In medium bowl beat egg whites until stiff peaks form; set aside. In large bowl beat egg yolks and sugar until well blended. Add all remaining ingredients except egg whites. Beat until smooth. Fold in egg whites until well blended. Heat aebleskiver pan over medium heat until drops of water sizzle. Using about 1 tablespoon batter fill greased cups in aebleskiver pan about half full. Cook until lightly browned on bottom (2 to 3 minutes); turn with fork or knitting needle. Continue cooking until browned on bottom (2 to 3 minutes). Balls are done when wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean.

Roll in sugar; serve hot. 35 pancake balls
Nutrition Information Serving Size: 1 pancake ball
Calories 45
Protein 2g
Carbohydrate 7g
Fat 1g
Cholesterol 19 mg
Sodium 100 mg

 

Innkeeper's Aebleskiver

4 1/2 oz (125 grams) wheat four,
3 oz (75 grams) margarine,
11 fluid oz (1/3 liter) buttermilk,
1 egg,
1 oz (25 grams) sugar,
1/2 teaspoon baking soda,
lemon, cardamom or vanilla or cinnamon according to taste.

Stir the four, baking soda and sugar into the buttermilk until the mixture begins to thicken. Then add the egg, melted margarine and lemon, cardamom or vanilla or cinnamon. Cook at moderate heat for approximately 5 to 6 minutes or until brown and cooked through.

Grandmother's Aebleskiver

7 oz (200 grams) wheat flour
3 1/2 oz (100 grams) margarine
8.5 fluid oz (1/4 liter) milk
3 eggs
1 oz (25 grams) sugar
3/4 oz (20 grams) yeast
vanilla, shredded peel and juice of 1/2 lemon.

Stir eggs and sugar together. Mix yeast into warm milk and add to mixture. Finally, add the flour, melted margarine, vanilla and lemon. Allow the dough to rise for 20 minutes and then cook at a moderate heat for approximately 5 to 6 minutes or until brown and cooked through.

Gustavson's Aebleskiver

2/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 1/2 teaspoons butter
5 tablespoons heavy cream
3 eggs, separated
1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly grated lemon peel melted confectioner's sugar

Beat the egg whites until stiff. With the same beater, beat the egg yolks until frothy. Combine the flour, sugar and salt and sift into the egg yolks in three stages, adding the cream alternately. Add the lemon peel, then stir in the melted butter. Stir a little of the egg whites into the mixture to lighten it, then gently fold in the remaining egg whites. Makes 14 aebleskiver.

Yeast Aebleskiver

250 grams flour
1/2 liter light cream or milk
3 eggs
1 teaspoon sugar
25 grams yeast, ...

Sift flour with sugar and salt. Mix yeast with lukewarm cream (or milk). Add eggs (one at a time). Combine all of the previous. Leave for approximately 2 hours to raise. Bake in Aebleskiver pan to golden brown at low heat. NOTES : 10 grams of baking powder could be added, then the cream should not be heated and the Aebleskiver should be baked at once. A little apple sauce or pieces of apple could be added while baking. Serve with either sifted confectioners sugar, blackberry jam or both. At Christmas I would suggest serving with glogg.

Danish Favorites

4 c Flour
NO ADDED FAT
1 1/2 c Cream
2 c Milk
8 Eggs -- (separated)
6 tb Sugar
1 1/4 Ts Salt, -- optional 8 Ts Baking powder

Sift together the flour, sugar , salt and baking powder (set aside). In a mixing bowl beat the egg yolks well, then add the cream and milk. Mix into this the dry ingredients that have been sifted together. Beat egg whites till stiff, and carefully fold into batter. In hot Aebleskiver pan put 1 1/2 tsp. oil in each cup. Then spoon or pour in batter just to the top of each cup. Bake (fry) until delicately brown underneath, loosen around edges with fork, quickly turn and brown other side. Use cake tester to determine when done. Be careful not to get your pan too hot as the aebleskiver burn easily. Serve dipped in sugar or syrup, or good quality jam or jelly. Makes about 50. Recipe can be easily halved. NOTES : The basic recipe came from the "Danish Favorites" cookbook, Fredsville Lutheran Church, Grundy County Iowa. * Exported from MasterCook * Aebleskiver Recipe By : Chef Ulrich Riedner

Pea Soup Andersen's Scandinavian-American Cookbook

2 cups flour
NO ADDED FAT
2 cups buttermilk
3 each egg
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon cardamom.

Beat yolks of eggs with buttermilk. Mix together sugar, salt, flour, baking powder, baking soda, and cardamom. Beat egg whites until stiff. Mix egg yolk-buttermilk mixture with dry ingredients. Add egg whites, carefully folding them in so that they don't break down. Heat aebleskive pan. Put 1 tsp. salad oil in each hole and fill completely with batter. Let bake until slightly crusty on bottom. Turn slightly with a knitting needle or skewer. Continue cooking, turning the ball to keep it from burning, until the knitting needle comes out clean when stuck in the center. Serve aebleskive hot with powdered sugar, jam, and jelly. Source: Pea Soup Andersen's Scandinavian-American Cookbook

 

 

This one is from Doc Bug.

Aebleskiver

Years ago I was introduced to aebleskiver, a Danish holiday breakfast food that's best described as a spherical pancake. (Aebleskiver is Danish for Apple...uh... Skiver.) The little balls are made using a special cast-iron pan with half-spherical hollows, called an Aebleskiver pan or sometimes called a monk's pan. Dough is put into a hot hollow, and soon forms a crusty half-ball with still uncooked dough in the middle. Then the ball is flipped over using a knitting needle (traditional) or wooden skewer (my style) and the remaining dough flows into the hollow and forms the other half of the ball.

Last year I picked up an aebleskiver pan and tried making some aebleskiver for Thanksgiving breakfast, following the recipe that came with the pan. They were awful — the outsides were charred and the insides were rubbery. I take it as a sign that my family truly loves me that they ate any at all. So I went to the Net and downloaded some different recipes, and tried again at Christmas. (One advantage of having to split your holidays among parts of the family is you can repeat experiments like this on an unsuspecting audience.) This one was better, but the rubbery after-texture remained.

So then I got serious. Being a scientist at heart, I solicited aebleskiver recipes from anyone who knew someone with a Danish grandmother, downloaded more off the Net, and picked a set of five that fairly well spanned the space. Like most folk recipes, they varied widely — some called for low heat and some for high, some for lightly mixing the ingredients and some for thoroughly mixed, some for baking powder, some for buttermilk, some for yeast, and one called for beer. Then I invited a friend over and we set out to make micro-batches of aebleskiver, taking careful notes along the way.

They were all bad. Every last one. Only two of them weren't rubbery in the middle, and those had a bitter after taste. Experimentation had failed; it was time to resort to theory.

We pulled out The Cook's Bible, a great cookbook done by the editor of Cook's Illustrated, and started browsing the index. This led to a discussion on the science of waffles, full of tidbits like the fact that a waffle is fried on the outside and steamed on the inside, that browned waffles are more flavorful than just tanned ones because of the Maillard reaction, that buttermilk and baking soda is the key to a good thick batter and baking powder leaves the batter thin and bitter, and that you want to mix liquid and dry ingredients with a very light touch so you don't burst the CO2 bubbles formed by the buttermilk's lactic acid reacting with the baking soda. Best of all, it had a master recipe for waffles that took all these principles into account. We tried it, and the aebleskiver came out perfect!

Here's a synopsis of the master waffle recipe described in The Cook's Bible, modified only slightly for aebleskiver. I find I still have to sacrifice a batch or two to the skiver gods when I'm using a new oven to get the right pan temperature, but this recipe has yet to let me down. (Note to Danish grandmothers out there: if this recipe goes against all that is holy about a proper aebleskiver batter, just chalk this up as yet another example of American ignorant hubris and ignore it.)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons cornmeal (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 eggs, separated
  • Between 1.75 and 1.875 cups buttermilk
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
  • diced apple, applesauce, apple butter or jam (optional)
  • cardamom or cinnamon to taste (optional)

Directions

  1. Put the aebleskiver pan on a medium-to-high heat. The goal here is to have the pan good and hot (around 390°) by the time the batter is ready.
  2. Whisk the dry ingredients together. Whisk the egg yolks with the buttermilk and melted butter in a separate bowl.
  3. Beat the egg whites until they just hold a 2-inch peak. (The Bible specifically admonishes that you not over beat the whites.)
  4. Add the liquid buttermilk-butter-yolk mixture to the dry ingredients in a slow, steady stream while gently mixing with a rubber spatula. This is where the gentle hand comes in — you want as many of those invisible bubbles intact as possible. I find it easiest to do this step with one person slowly pouring while another mixes. You should still have large patches of dry ingredients by the time you finish, this is more wetting of the batter than mixing.
  5. Fold in the egg whites, again with a light touch. Again, the Bible emphasizes that it's better to under mix than to over mix.
  6. Place a little butter in one of the pan's hollows. It's not really necessary to grease the sides of the hollow as well, but I do anyway. Then take a small ladle or big spoon and fill the hollow not-quite-to-the-top with batter. Depending on how hot your pan is, you may need to add batter quickly so the butter doesn't hit its smoke point. Fill the other hollows the same way.
  7. Add a little diced apple or jam to top of each dough-ball, and cap it off with a little more dough (optional).
  8. By the time you've finished filling the last hollow, the first one should be just about ready for turning. Take your specially-designed Danish knitting needle (or wooden skewer, or whatever) and poke the batter right at the edge of your first hollow. A semi-spherical shell should pop up out of the hollow. Push it so it caps off the hollow, allowing the uncooked dough from the center of the shell to fall into the hollow. Repeat for the other hollows.
  9. Now it's just about turning the balls every now and then to give them an even heat, though honestly they don't really need turning (I just can't help fidgeting with them). Remove from pan when a toothpick comes out clean, usually about 5 or 6 minutes. The aebleskiver should be brown (not just tan).
  10. Serve immediately. If you added jam or applesauce to the centers, be sure to warn your guests that while the bread may merely be hot the fruit may be molten.

Enjoy!

These are from Temporary Works.

These are two recipes for the Danish dessert "Aebleskiver." You will need an aebleskiver pan to do it correctly.

Heat the aebleskiver pan and put a little fat into each of the hollows (oil gives off less fumes). Alternatively, the fat may be added to the dough if you have a pan with a good non-stick surface. Fill the hollows three quarters full of dough. Once a crust has formed on the aebleskiver they should be turned frequently during baking until golden brown in color (a knitting needle is useful for this purpose).

 

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Innkeeper's Aebleskiver

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4 1/2 oz (125 grams) wheat four, 1/2 teaspoon baking soda, 1 oz (25 grams) sugar, 3 oz (75 grams) margarine, 11 fluid oz (1/3 liter) buttermilk, 1 egg, lemon, cardamom or vanilla or cinnamon according to taste.

Stir the four, baking soda and sugar into the buttermilk until the mixture begins to thicken. Then add the egg, melted margarine and lemon, cardamom or vanilla or cinnamon. Cook at moderate heat for approximately 5 to 6 minutes or until brown and cooked through.

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Grandmother's Aebleskiver

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8.5 fluid oz (1/4 liter) milk, 7 oz (200 grams) wheat flour, 3 eggs, 1 oz (25 grams) sugar, 3/4 oz (20 grams) yeast, 3 1/2 oz (100 grams) margarine, vanilla, shredded peel and juice of 1/2 lemon.

Stir eggs and sugar together. Mix yeast into warm milk and add to mixture. Finally, add the flour, melted margarine, vanilla and lemon.

Allow the dough to rise for 20 minutes and then cook at a moderate heat for approximately 5 to 6 minutes or until brown and cooked through.

 

Recipes from around Denmark. 

On this page there will from time to time appear new scrumptious recipes and fun ideas for your entertaining pleasure.  I am sure you are like most, always looking to find new ideas to entertain your friends and family.

Right now we have these various recipes for aebleskiver, to go with  your pleasure of serving something new.  When we find other fun items, we will be glad to send them to you, but will need your E-mail address to do that.

     Traditional recipe.

    The egg white from 2 eggs
    2 cups of buttermilk
    2 cups of regular all purpose flour
    2 teaspoons baking powder
    1 tablespoon of regular sugar
   1/2 teaspoon of salt
   1/2 cup of melted butter.

Mix all dry ingredients together and stir in the buttermilk.  Whip the egg whites and fold them into the  batter,  then add the melted butter.
When the aebleskiver pan is hot (not too hot) you add some cooking oil to each hole and let it get hot.  Then pour in the batter and turn the batter with knitting needles and keep turning until baked all the way through. 

Serve with a sprinkling of powdered sugar and raspberry jam on top.


 

Recipe compliments from 


Lindgren's B&B
Lutsen, Minnesota.

   4 separated eggs.
  
2 tablespoons of sugar
  
1/2 teaspoon salt
   2 tablespoons vegetable oil
   2 cup buttermilk
   1 teaspoon baking soda
   2 cups all purpose flour
   oil or lard

Beat egg whites until stiff, set aside.  Beat rest of ingredients until batter is very smooth.  Fold in egg whites.  Heat well seasoned aebleskiver pan.  (See tip below)  with 1/8 teaspoon oil or lard in each of the seven holes.  Fill each hole with batter.  When browned on one side (almost right away), turn with knitting needle and keep turning until needle comes out clean after piercing through the cake.  Serve with flavored butters, such as maple or cinnamon honey, syrup, jam and brown or white sugar.

You can purchase an aebleskiver pan at this site, as well as the easy "Arne's Instant Aebleskiver Mix"


These are recipes from the Village Kitchen.

Yeast Aebleskiver

   250 grams flour
   1/2 liter cream or milk
   3 eggs
   1 teaspoon sugar
   25 grams yeast

Sift flour with sugar and salt.  Mix yeast with lukewarm cream (or milk).  Add eggs (one at the time).  Combine all of the previous.  Leave for approximately 2 hours to raise. Bake in aebleskiver pan to golden brown at low heat. NOTES: 10 grams of baking powder could be added, then the cream should not be heated and the aebleskiver should be baked at once.  A little apple sauce or pieces of apple could be added while baking.  Serve with either sifted confectioners sugar, blackberry jam or both.  At Christmas I would suggest serving with Gloegg.


One more from the Village Kitchen

Grandmother's aebleskiver.

   7 oz (200grams) wheat flour
   3 1/2 oz (100 grams) margarine
   8,5 fluid oz (1/4 liter) milk
   3 eggs
   1 oz (25 grams) sugar
   3/4 oz (20 grams ) yeast
   vanilla, shredded peel and juice of 1/2 lemon.

Stir eggs and sugar together.  Mix yeast into warm milk and add to mixture.  Finally, add the flour, melted margarine, vanilla and lemon.  Allow the dough to rise for 20 minutes and then cook at a moderate heat for approximately 5 to 6 minutes or until golden brown and cooked through.


The last one from the Village Kitchen

Gustavson's aebleskiver

   2/3 cup all-purpose flour
   2 1/2 teaspoons butter
   5 tablespoons heavy cream
   3 eggs, separated
   1 teaspoon sugar
   1/4 teaspoon salt
   1/4 teaspoon freshly grated lemon peel melted confectioner's sugar.

Beat the egg whites stiff.  With the same beater, beat the egg yolks until frothy.  Combine the flour, sugar and salt and sift into the egg yolks in three stages, adding the cream alternately.  Add the lemon peel, then stir in the melted butter.  Stir a little of the egg whites into the mixture to lighten it, then gently 
fold in the remaining egg whites.  Makes 14 aebleskiver.

Aebleskiver


Aebleskiver is a delicious round pancake ball that is a popular dessert and breakfast treat. It is considered the signature dish of Denmark.

         
INGREDIENTS
  2 cups buttermilk
  2 cups flour
  3 eggs
  1 tsp baking powder
  ½ tsp salt
  1 tsp baking soda
  2 tbsp sugar
         
PREPARATION  
  1.   Beat yolks; add sugar, salt, milk; then add flour, soda and baking powder which have been sifted together.
  2.   Fold in beaten egg whites.
  3.   Bake in shortening in an Aebleskiver pan.  When half baked, turn with fork and finish baking.
  4.   Serve with granulated or powdered sugar, jam, jelly, or applesauce.
 
VARIATION: Add 1 tsp cardamon
 
Danish Sisterhood recipe courtesy of Alice Thuesen Imig, Lodge 22, Muskegon, MI & Lodge 6, Omaha, NE.

This was submitted by Jason:

Every year, the town I live in has a street fair where aebleskiver are sold. My son, who is autistic, is on a gluten free/casein free diet, so he can't eat the aebleskiver at the fair because they use wheat flour and milk. So, I decided to make gluten free aebleskiver using gluten free pancake mix and coconut milk. I also add flax seed meal and cinnamon. I had much success, but without anyone to show me how to turn them properly, my aebleskiver always come out a bit strange in shape. Thanks to your video on the website, my gluten free aebleskiver are now perfectly round! Thank you! My kids love them - even the folks not on my son's diet!

No problem. To keep the aebleskiver gluten free/casein free ("gfcf"), I use my very favorite pancake mix from the folks at The Really Great Food Company. They produce the best gfcf pancake mix I've tasted.

In addition to the pancake mix, I like to add a couple teaspoons flax seed meal, cinnamon and a teaspoon of vanilla. I find that a mix of coconut milk and almond milk in place of regular milk does a great job. Also, I've seen people use Crisco or some other shortening in the pan, but I use grape seed oil instead. Nothing artificial.

Jason

.

 
 This recipe is in Danish for my Danish friends. If you need to have it figured in American measurements, you will have to do it yourself. I have promised to add it unchanged to my recipe website.

 

Kærnemælks-æbleskiver (ca. 30 stk.)
 
250 hvedemel, 1/2 tsk. salt, 1 spsk. sukker, 1 tsk. citronsaft, 1/2 liter lærnemælk, 2 æggeblommer, 100g smeltet smør, 2 æggehvider, 1/2 tsk. natron, 1-2 æbler, skrællet og skæret i små stykker
 
Mel, salt og sukker blandes godt. Citronsaft og kærnemælk røres i lidt efter lidt. Æggeblommerne tilsættes. Lige før bagningen røres smeltet smør i. Æggehviderne piskes stiv med natron og vendes forsigtigt i. Panden varmes. I hvert hul dryppes lidt smeltet smør, og hullet fyldes 1/2 med dej. Læg et eller to stk. æble forsigtigt ind i hvert hul og tryk dem lidt ned. Fyld hullerne med lidt mere dej, så de bliver fyldt 3/4 med dej.  Æbleskiverne vendes, når de er faste i bunden, og bages ved jævn varme ca. 8 min. De vendes ofte med en gaffel. De serveres varme med strøsukker og syltetøj.

Submitted from 

Nicole Jakobsen

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